Burger King Takes Over Homes with Invasive Commercial

Fast food giant Burger Kind managed to make headlines with their all-new commercial but probably not in the way they were expecting.

Take a look:

While the ad may seem innocent to those who operate a low-tech home, for those that have home assistant (specifically a Google home device) weren’t all that amused.

The commercial was specifically designed to activate the Google home device, which then read off the first lines of the Whopper Wikipedia page. This essentially forced the Google devices to provide a lot of free advertising for the company.

Needless to say, people weren’t all that thrilled.

Just a few short hours after the ad was launched Google, who was not consulted on the ad, stopped the ad from triggering the devices putting an end to the invasive commercial.

The prank itself was a clever move but could end up having negative effects in the end.

The first was internet trolls altering the Whopper’s Wikipedia page to say the burger contained “cyanide” and a “medium-sized child.” As a result, the page is currently blocked from being edited.

This isn’t the first time in-home technology has gone a little crazy as devices like the Google Home and Amazon Echo have become more popular.

Earlier this year the Amazon Echo made the news when a 6-year old from Texas managed to order $160 from Amazon including a dollhouse and four pounds of cookies.

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The trouble didn’t end there.

A subsequent news reports on the story inadvertently triggered Echo devices around the country to attempt to repeat the same order.

Google Home experienced a similar issue when a Superbowl commercial for the device triggered devices causing them to shut off lights and lower the television volume.

This latest snafu adds to the growing list of privacy and safety concerns coming from these “personal assistant” devices especially for those that control your homes security systems and door locks.

Burger King has said they will continue to run the commercial for the time being despite Google having blocked the ad. It will still trigger the device with the prompt “ok Google” but remains silent on the Whopper.

As of January, an estimated 8.2 million of Amazon’s devices have found their way into homes around the world. There are no numbers on Google Home devices.

Did your home fall victim to Burger Kings prank ad?

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Not Exempt From the Rules: Donald Trump Could Be Banned From Twitter

Our President-Elect is probably best known for his outrageous use of the popular micro-blogging site Twitter and I have certainly shared my annoyance with this on my personal blog.

Recent Tweets from Trump might be landed him in hot water with Twitter as his bullying tactics have entered the realm of violating the site’s terms of service which could get Mr. President-Elect banned for life.

Twitter’s Terms state that users “may not incite or engage in the targeted abuse or harassment of others”. It makes clear that it will consider a range of factors when deciding whether to lock or ban someone’s account – including whether the reported account is being “one-sided or includes threats”, or is “inciting others to harass another account”.

The following tweet directed towards an Indianapolis Chuck Jones has raised eyebrows regarding Donald’s social media usage.

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Following the tweet Jones began receiving threatening phone calls and messages.

This tweet and the abuse that followed closely echoes the behavior that saw Brietbart contributor Milo Yiannopoulos being banned from Twitter earlier this year. He was permanently banned from having an account on the site because he sent public messages harassing Ghostbusters actress Leslie Jones which led to an onslaught of racial slurs and hate speech from others.

From any standpoint this kinds of behavior is troubling from the man who would be President and it’s sending a poor message to all that this is an acceptable way to act whether online or off. This has been a major issue for me since Donald announced his campaign and moreso now that he has won. What kind of example is his setting for our youth?

Regardless, this is certainly a fantastic “teachable moment” as we move towards the holiday break and a reminder for all to be respectful towards one another both online and off.

What are your thoughts on Trump’s almost obsessive use of twitter?

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Think Twice Before Posting A Photo of Your Ballot

If you haven’t already (by mail-in or early voting) we are all embarking on the most insane election this country has ever witnessed. Regardless of who you are voting for it’s important to realize that taking a photo or selfie of your ballot may land you in a whole lot of trouble and even invalidate your vote.

Perhaps take a moment before you text, tweet, snapchat, instagram, facebook or post your vote anywhere online.

Take a moment to review the law in your state and be sure to get out and vote on November 8th!

Where ballot selfies are allowed

Connecticut. No law bans ballot selfies, according to Patrick Gallahue, a spokesman for Secretary of State Denise Merrill. But election moderators have discretion to prohibit activity “that threatens the orderly process of voting or the privacy of another voter’s ballot.”

District of Columbia. There’s no ban. Election officials discourage people from taking pictures but won’t do anything to stop them, said Tamara Robinson, a spokeswoman for the D.C. Board of Elections.

Hawaii. A law passed this year allows voters to share a digital image of one’s own marked ballot.

Idaho. There’s no law banning them, the secretary of state’s office said.

Indiana. A federal judge last year barred the state from enforcing a new law prohibiting ballot selfies.

Kentucky. Secretary of State spokesman Bradford Queen says state law does not allow people to record the likeness of a voter, but the law does not say whether voters can record their own likeness. Therefore, the secretary of state’s office routinely tells county clerks the law does not prohibit ballot selfies.

Louisiana. Secretary of State Tom Schedler says ballot selfies are allowed in the state, though he’s not a fan of them.

Maine. The secretary of state discourages ballot selfies because there’s a ban on making unauthorized ballot copies, but there’s no law against voters posting photos of their marked ballot.

Michigan. A federal judge on Monday blocked enforcement of a ban on ballot selfies, saying it violates free speech. Lawyers for Secretary of State Ruth Johnson predicted “chaos” at polling places, but the judge on Wednesday denied the state’s request to freeze her order while they appeal.

Minnesota. Allowed as long as they’re not shown to fellow voters at the polling place or capture another person in the photo.

Montana. Law does not specifically prohibit the use of cameras at polling places, but election administrators and judges have broad authority to limit disruptive activity, according to Emily Dean, spokeswoman for the secretary of state. Sharing photos of absentee ballots is also not banned.

Nebraska. Gov. Pete Ricketts signed a bill in April that allows someone to show their marked ballots to others without risking a $100 fine.

New Hampshire. The 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston last month upheld a decision that a ban was unconstitutional, saying it suppresses a large swath of political speech and there was no evidence to support the state’s concerns.

North Dakota. Photos inside polling places are allowed.

Oregon. All voting is done through mail-in ballots, which voters are free to photograph. A state law prohibiting showing a marked ballot to another person was repealed in 2014, according to Molly Woon, a spokeswoman for Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins.

Rhode Island. The Board of Elections adopted new rules in time for November’s election that allow for selfie-taking inside polling places. The updated regulations allow voters to take photos as long as they don’t show another person’s ballot.

Utah. Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill last year that makes it legal for people to snap pictures of themselves with their ballots. The law makes it a misdemeanor to photograph someone else’s ballot.

Vermont. No rules regarding photos in polling places. Clerks are encouraged to adopt specific rules for their polling places to maintain order, according to Jim Condos, a spokesman for the secretary of state.

Virginia. Attorney General Mark Herring issued a formal opinion last month that says ballot selfies are legal in Virginia. Nothing in Virginia law prohibits voters from taking pictures of themselves, fellow voters or their ballot within the polling place, he said.

Washington state. It’s not against the law in Washington, but a spokesman for Secretary of State Kim Wyman said the office doesn’t recommend it.

Wyoming. No laws against ballot selfies. Law does allow judges of elections to “preserve order at the polls by any necessary and suitable means.”

Where ballot selfies are illegal

Alabama. Not allowed because voters have “a right to cast a ballot in secrecy and in private,” said a spokesman for Secretary of State John Merrill.

Alaska. A state law bans voters from showing their marked ballots, but Division of Elections Director Josie Bahnke says there is no practical way to enforce it.

Colorado. Ballot selfies or any public dissemination of a marked ballot are considered a misdemeanor. A 2016 bill to repeal the ban failed.

Florida. Photographs are not allowed in polling places or of mailed ballots.

Georgia. Law prevents photos of ballots or the screens of electronic voting machines.

Illinois. Banned by a law that considers “knowingly” marking your ballot so that another person can see it is a felony that carries a prison sentence of one to three years.

Kansas. Secretary of state says a selfie showing a picture of the actual ballot violates state law.

Massachusetts. Taking a photo of a completed ballot in a polling location is banned in Massachusetts. But the state’s top election official, Secretary William Galvin, says there’s little the state can do to prevent it. Photos of mailed ballots are also banned.

Mississippi. Photos showing how someone marked their ballot after voting are prohibited.

Nevada. Photos inside polling places are not allowed, except by the media. Photos of mailed ballots are also banned.

New Jersey. Law prohibits voters from showing their ballot to others. A pending legislative measure would allow voters to take photos of their own ballots while in the voting booth and share it on social media.

New Mexico. Law prohibits voters from showing their marked paper ballot “to any person in such a way as to reveal its contents.”

New York. Photos showing a completed ballot or indicating how a person cast their vote are not allowed.

North Carolina. Photographing or otherwise recording a voted official ballot is not allowed.

South Carolina. Law bars voters from allowing their ballots to be seen. A 2012 state attorney general’s opinion says that makes it illegal to reproduce a ballot by cellphone, video camera or iPad.

South Dakota. Secretary of State Shantel Krebs says ballot selfies are not allowed because they can be considered influencing a vote or forcing someone to show proof of voting.

Wisconsin. State law prohibits sharing photos of ballots.

Where ballot selfies’ legality mixed, unclear

Arizona. Bars photography within 75 feet of polling places. But the Legislature changed the law that barred showing photos of completed ballots in 2015 to allow posting of early ballots on social media.

Arkansas. Nothing in state law prohibits taking photos while in a polling place as long as it’s not disruptive or being used for electioneering purposes, but state law on sharing voter choices is unclear.

California. Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill last month that repeals a 125-year-old law barring voters from showing people their marked ballots. The change will take effect nearly two months after the presidential election, but legislative analysts have found no occasion of the ban being enforced. The author of the bill, in fact, has been sharing constituents’ photos of marked ballots on social media since the law passed.

Delaware. Has a policy against cellphones in voting booths, but elections Commissioner Elaine Manlove said: “I don’t know that we can control what happens behind the curtain.”

Iowa. Law prohibits the use of cameras, cellphones or other electronic devices in voting booths, so Secretary of State Paul Pate has asked voters not to take selfies with ballots. Photos of absentee ballots are OK.

Maryland. Bans electronic devices in a polling place except for the media. And even media members aren’t allowed to photograph a ballot that shows how someone is voting. But photos of mailed ballots are OK.

Missouri. Law prohibits voters from allowing others to see their ballots if the intent is to show how they voted. Secretary of State spokeswoman Stephanie Fleming described ballot selfies as a “gray area” and advises voters to check with local election authorities.

Ohio. Has a longstanding prohibition against voters letting their ballot be seen with the “apparent intention” of letting it be known how they are about to vote. The state elections chief has advised local election boards to consult their own attorneys about how to apply the law. Two Republican lawmakers are sponsoring a bill they say will let voters photograph and make public their marked ballots.

Oklahoma. Officials recommend against it, noting that state law dating back about 40 years suggests it is illegal but outlines no penalties.

Pennsylvania. Law prohibits someone from revealing their ballot “letting it be known how” they’re “about to vote.” But officials recently released guidance on electronic items in polling places that noted the recent court cases that “found a First Amendment right to take ‘ballot selfies.'”

Tennessee. Voters are not allowed to take photos or videos while in polling places. They’re only allowed to use electronic devices for informational purposes to assist during voting, according to Adam Ghassemi, a spokesman for Secretary of State Tre Hargett. The state’s law doesn’t address mail-in ballots.

Texas. Bars photography within 100 feet of polling stations, so selfies are not allowed. Photos of mail-in ballots are OK.

West Virginia. Electronic devices are banned inside voting booths, according to Secretary of State Natalie Tennant. Nothing in the law prohibits photos of mail-in ballots.

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

My Unsolicited Advice to the Class of 2020

Three years ago I sat down and reminisced about my time in college, specifically my involvement in campus life and how that experience came to shape my life and career. This time of reflection resulted in my wildly popular blog entry “My Unsolicited Advice to the Class of 2017.

As I’m been working on my book You’re Doing it Wrong (available soon!) I’ve been looking back on a lot of different moments in my life in reflection and drawing out the lessons I learned from them. A big part of my life was spent at Salem State University and there’s a lot I wish I had known going into it all.

So I’ve decided to help out the class of 2020 by offering up some of pearls of wisdom. Here are some things I wish I knew as a college freshman.

Get Involved!

I know I stressed this a lot of my original “Unsolicited Advice” entry but I want to make sure the point is driven home (especially if you did read it). By immersing yourself in the campus community you are not only going to have a stro

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The office of the Program Council was all business except when it was a whole lot of fun (which was always)

nger sense of belonging but a healthy social life to boot! Some of my best friends were met through my involvement on campus and many of the skills that I use in my job today were developed while working with groups and clubs on campus.

Take Advantage of Campus Offerings

Just because you don’t follow through with being a member of a club doesn’t mean you can’t take advantage of the amazing offerings. Our campus’ Program Council (I was their Publicist my senior year) was responsible for many amazing events happening on campus and a good number of them were free including movie nights, poetry readings, comedians, magicians and so much more. The Student Theatre Ensemble hosted theatrical events every semester. There were dances, improv troupes, and so much more. Like I said, many of these events were incredibly cheap or even free. At one point our Program Council bought a chunk of tickets to a Red Sox game and sold them for $10 each.

Don’t Spread Yourself Too Thin               

College is tough. It may not too so right away with your introductory courses but it’s very easy to get overwhelmed by it all. Make sure to budget your time wisely especially when involved on campus on top of taking a full-time course load. By all means check everything out when it comes to extra-curricular but try to quickly narrow it down to what you’re most passionate about and what fits well with your schedule. Same goes for choosing classes, put together a schedule that makes sense and doesn’t have you sprinting all over campus.

Get To Know Your Professors

When it comes to the educator/student relationship forget everything you knew in high
school. Take the time to get to know your professors outside of the classroom. Visit them

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Professor Peter Zachari (Pictured here performing in a production of Shake It Up!) was one of my biggest influences in college and taught me so much outside of the classroom. Today I credit much of my success to him.

during office hours and take advantage of lunch offers. Each semester our dining hall actually offered free lunch to student dining with their professor. I can’t even begin to describe some of the amazing conversations and insights I receive during these lunches and chats, especially when it came to classes I was struggling with. It also helps later on down the career line if you’re looking for a letter of recommendation or the scoop on an internship.

Don’t Be Shy

Be sure to branch out in that first year and strike up conversations with strangers. This is how I made many of the friends I had during my first semester. Some didn’t stick around beyond that first half of the year but the experience of chatting up that one stranger gave me the confidence to chat up and meet others. One of the best things I would do, and this is something I highly encourage, would pick a couple people in class and exchange contact information. This way I had someone to reach out to if I missed a class and needed notes and offered them the same. I can see this idea changing a bit with the wake of social networking (Facebook didn’t show up until my second semester of college and it was a difference animal back then). Get to know the people in classes and out. It’s a lifesaver!

Sleep

Had I known about the ‘3 by 5’ rule when I was in college I would have been sure to follow it. The rule states that you should study three hours a day, five days a week. Now, that sounds like a lot but when I consider the little bits of time I would waste between classes, I could have been studying. Try to find those random chunks of time during your day to get in your reading or studying to help limit the all-nighters. Cramming to all hours and not getting any sleep is super counter-productive.  Try your best to study those three hours a day and see how much it helps balance your social life and sleep schedule!

Get Off Campus and Explore

I went to college in historic Salem, MA (home of the witch trials!). There was so much to explore and experience outside of the halls of academia. I encourage you to explore the area where you are receiving your education and learn more about it. Even if you feel like you o to school in the middle of nowhere, get to know your new home! Salem was a short train ride away from Boston which offered even more exploration. Take advantage and have fun!

Don’t Buy All Your Books Right Away

Okay, this is gonna raise some eyebrows but I’m gonna go ahead and say it. Don’t buy your books right away. Wait until you get to class, check out the syllabus and go from there. I took a lot of literature classes which required hundreds of dollars for books. It was enough to make one cry. The first thing I would do is take a look at the workload the professor was requiring and whether or not I could make it work with everything else I had going on that semester. If I was sticking with the class I would then look for the book online rather than in the bookstore in an effort to save money. If I ended up dropping the class or switching to another, I wasn’t stuck with books I wouldn’t need. Also check out Studentrate.com to compare textbook prices.

Discounts! Discounts everywhere!

Carry your school ID everywhere, especially if you live in a “college town.” So many different restaurants and shops offered student discounts but didn’t advertise them. Don’t ever be afraid to ask about student discounts for food, movies even museum admissions. You’d be surprised where you can save a few dollars here and there if you just ask. Be sure to have your ID for when they say ‘yes’!

Have Fun

I’m sure there are many more things I could mention but for now I’ll leave it with what I have above. As I think of more I’ll certainly write up new blog posts. All said and done g out there and discover the new you. This is a whole new chapter of your life and a time to discover who you truly are. Get out there and do it!

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Anti-Gay Internet Trolls Are No Match for J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling is easily one of the greatest voices the in world. While she certainly isn’t perfect, she is one that will not hesitate to sound off when she sees something amiss in the world. She is an advocate in every sense of the word and stands for what she believes in. So when a Christian group on Twitter began making homophobic remarks about one of her countrymen, she was having none of that nonsense.

Another person I greatly admire is Olympian Diver Tom Daley. He is not only an amazing athlete but another who stands for what he believes in and inspiration to many.

Following Daley’s early exit from the Rio Olympics UK religious group Christian Voice took to twitter to voice their opinion on the matter:

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Despite instant and insane backlash over the tweet, the group wasn’t fazed and continued on with their anti-gay rant, dragging Daley’s fiancé (screenwriter Dustin Lance Black) into the mix:

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A number of people came rushing to Daley and Black’s defense, most notably J.K. Rowling who shut it all down with her no-nonsense attitude:

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Christian Voice seems to forget that, despite coming in last for the men’s solo 10 metre platform diving, Daley won a Bronze medal during the men’s 10 metre synchronized dive with teammate Dan Goodfellow.

This wasn’t the first time Rowling has shown support and love for the gay community. Following the shooting at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Rowling showed her support, not only for the entire community, but for those who were working at the Harry Potter areas of Universal Studios in Florida including my friend Luis Vielma.

Rowling wasn’t the only big name jumping to Daley’s defense. One British politician jumped in with another shut down:

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It wasn’t all negative following the diver’s from the olympics. Fiance Dustin Lance Black voiced his support

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Despite being “heartbroken” by his shock early exit from the competition, the diver hinted to the BBC that he will be returning for another shot at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Ellen Catching Heat for “Racist” Twitter Post

We live in a very politically correct world so this story really comes as no surprise.

Everyone’s favorite human being (and voice of the beloved Dory) has cause a bit of a stir by posting the following meme on her twitter account:

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In case you aren’t following the Olympics at all (I’m not) the man in the picture is Usain Bolt who won the men’s 100 metres gold medal with a time of 9.81 seconds. With this win, Bolt became the first athlete to win the event three times at the Olympic Games.

As a follower of Ellen, I saw the tweet the other day on honestly thought nothing of it. I chuckled an moved on with my day.

Other people seemed to have a different interpretation of the meme:

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Not everyone was on board with the idea of racism however and quickly came to the TV host’s defense:

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While the post has seemed to cause friction in the online world, Usain Bolt retweeted the image, finding the humor in it.

Ellen did respond to the onslaught of criticism but as of this posting has not removed the original tweet.

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Many have called for a boycott of the TV host saying that the tweet was in poor taste.

I see this as a great teachable moment to discuss with students as we head back to school. Was the tweet offensive? Is this a good time to reinforce the idea of ‘think before you post’?

What do you think?

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Pokémon Go Update Encourages User Safety

Okay. I’m sure at this point people are getting sick of me talking about Pokémon Go but I honestly can’t get over how much hate the app is getting. Now, I will argue that there are a number of updates I’d still like to see come to the app but if I’m being honest, they all pertain to game play.

So you’re probably thinking, “But Josh, you’re all about safety and clearly this app isn’t safe. Don’t you want to see updates to make it safer?”

Have you not been reading?

I’ve said it time and time again that social networking application and sites as well as these games WANT their users to be safe. They have done everything in their power to help their users be safer but when it comes down to it, there requires a degree of common sense.

In the latest update for the app, Pokémon Go has taken steps to ensure that users are safe.

Now, if you recall from “What Parents Should Know About Pokémon Go” the loading screen for the app features a Gyarados (I literally just learned what it was today when I caught one) with the warning “Remember to stay alert at all times! Stay aware of your surroundings!”

This warning has been there since day one.

Today, they have taken those reminders a step forward. As the app finishes loading, before the user can enter game play, a dialogue window will pop up with a new warning that users have to click on to make go away. Giving them a small reminder of safe game play.

Additionally , another aspect of the app is a speed sensor. As the app requires GPS to be on in order to catch Pokémon and as a result it knows your movement and how fast you are doing it.

Now, walking is a big part of the app as you can earn medals, find new Pokémon, hit the PokéStops and hatch eggs. In all generations of the app there has been a speed sensor and anyone moving faster than 12 MPH don’t receive “credit” for walking and it won’t count towards hatching eggs.screenshot_2016-08-09-21-25-22-1.png

In this latest update, Niantic has taken it a step further. When the app detects you going over a certain MPH (the exact number is unknown to me, I have experimented with it as a passenger and it varies too much to give a good answer).

The game itself won’t deactivate after a certain speed level but the warning is enough to give anyone pause.

Now, at the end of the day, it all comes down to whether or not the user chooses to heed the warnings.

So is Pokémon Go safe for your kids?

Yes.

The app is as safe as the user. I encourage parents to talk to their kids about safely using the app to hunt Pokémon.  Please review my warnings in my previous post “What Parents Should Know.”

I know I come across as defensive on the subject off Pokémon Go and I’m okay with it. Over the past month I’ve had a number of conversations (read: argument) about the safety and security of this app. Many people cite robberies and accidents (please read my post debunking rumors about the app) and others will point me towards news articles citing violence involving the app.

My problem is that a lot of these articles are what is known as “click bait”. They are purposely using words and phrases that will encourage someone to click on the link to earn money from advertisers. They will cite Pokémon Go as a part of the newsworthy event because it’s going to gain more attention.

This drives me insane.

Today, when my app updated, I was walking around Universal Studios playing the game with my friend. The game itself has been a major help to me over the past month. With all that has been going on in my hometown of Orlando and my anxiety disorder, it has been very difficult for me to do the things I love which is going to theme parks.

I don’t do well in crowds as it is but recent events have intensified that. Having the distraction of hunting down Pokémon has been a big help. I was able distracted from the summer crowds and even able to survive a 75 minute wait for a ride (I typically can’t handle more than 15 minutes).

It may not seem like much, but this little game has meant a lot.

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.