Burger King Takes Over Homes with Invasive Commercial

Fast food giant Burger Kind managed to make headlines with their all-new commercial but probably not in the way they were expecting.

Take a look:

While the ad may seem innocent to those who operate a low-tech home, for those that have home assistant (specifically a Google home device) weren’t all that amused.

The commercial was specifically designed to activate the Google home device, which then read off the first lines of the Whopper Wikipedia page. This essentially forced the Google devices to provide a lot of free advertising for the company.

Needless to say, people weren’t all that thrilled.

Just a few short hours after the ad was launched Google, who was not consulted on the ad, stopped the ad from triggering the devices putting an end to the invasive commercial.

The prank itself was a clever move but could end up having negative effects in the end.

The first was internet trolls altering the Whopper’s Wikipedia page to say the burger contained “cyanide” and a “medium-sized child.” As a result, the page is currently blocked from being edited.

This isn’t the first time in-home technology has gone a little crazy as devices like the Google Home and Amazon Echo have become more popular.

Earlier this year the Amazon Echo made the news when a 6-year old from Texas managed to order $160 from Amazon including a dollhouse and four pounds of cookies.

AmazonGirl

The trouble didn’t end there.

A subsequent news reports on the story inadvertently triggered Echo devices around the country to attempt to repeat the same order.

Google Home experienced a similar issue when a Superbowl commercial for the device triggered devices causing them to shut off lights and lower the television volume.

This latest snafu adds to the growing list of privacy and safety concerns coming from these “personal assistant” devices especially for those that control your homes security systems and door locks.

Burger King has said they will continue to run the commercial for the time being despite Google having blocked the ad. It will still trigger the device with the prompt “ok Google” but remains silent on the Whopper.

As of January, an estimated 8.2 million of Amazon’s devices have found their way into homes around the world. There are no numbers on Google Home devices.

Did your home fall victim to Burger Kings prank ad?

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

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SnapChat Seems a bit Fruity Lately

It would seem that security is once again an issue on popular social app SnapChat.( You might remember the App from my entry this past summer highlighting what parents should know.) Once again the users of the App have found their security compromised.

Back in December the App was hacked and millions (4.6 million to be exact) of users phone numbers were exposed by a group wanting to call attention to security flaws within SnapChat.run-by-fruiting-mrs-doubtfire

SnapChat, in turn, responded with “Snap-chas” a security test similar to “Captchas” we’ve become so used to seeing on almost every website. The security tests involve spotting Snapchat’s ghost mascot in a group of nine different images before tapping on the images with the ghost in. The puzzles will attempt to prevent hackers from stealing phone numbers of users.

It’s not worth getting excited about- hackers broke through that security feature in a matter of hours.

This latest security breach involves run-by fruitings. Some friends e-mailed me saying that they have been receiving Snaps of Smoothies with a fishy-looking URL. A quick search has revealed that theirs and friends accounts have been hacked. The link takes you to a weight-loss suppliment site (if your curiosity is burning).

I would advise changing your password (and like with all passwords, change it regularly).

In addition it’s important to remember that using the same username and password for multiple social networking sites (while easy to remember) can put our information at risk. Once a hacker has one, they have everything.

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.