My Unsolicited Advice to the Class of 2020

Three years ago I sat down and reminisced about my time in college, specifically my involvement in campus life and how that experience came to shape my life and career. This time of reflection resulted in my wildly popular blog entry “My Unsolicited Advice to the Class of 2017.

As I’m been working on my book You’re Doing it Wrong (available soon!) I’ve been looking back on a lot of different moments in my life in reflection and drawing out the lessons I learned from them. A big part of my life was spent at Salem State University and there’s a lot I wish I had known going into it all.

So I’ve decided to help out the class of 2020 by offering up some of pearls of wisdom. Here are some things I wish I knew as a college freshman.

Get Involved!

I know I stressed this a lot of my original “Unsolicited Advice” entry but I want to make sure the point is driven home (especially if you did read it). By immersing yourself in the campus community you are not only going to have a stro

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The office of the Program Council was all business except when it was a whole lot of fun (which was always)

nger sense of belonging but a healthy social life to boot! Some of my best friends were met through my involvement on campus and many of the skills that I use in my job today were developed while working with groups and clubs on campus.

Take Advantage of Campus Offerings

Just because you don’t follow through with being a member of a club doesn’t mean you can’t take advantage of the amazing offerings. Our campus’ Program Council (I was their Publicist my senior year) was responsible for many amazing events happening on campus and a good number of them were free including movie nights, poetry readings, comedians, magicians and so much more. The Student Theatre Ensemble hosted theatrical events every semester. There were dances, improv troupes, and so much more. Like I said, many of these events were incredibly cheap or even free. At one point our Program Council bought a chunk of tickets to a Red Sox game and sold them for $10 each.

Don’t Spread Yourself Too Thin               

College is tough. It may not too so right away with your introductory courses but it’s very easy to get overwhelmed by it all. Make sure to budget your time wisely especially when involved on campus on top of taking a full-time course load. By all means check everything out when it comes to extra-curricular but try to quickly narrow it down to what you’re most passionate about and what fits well with your schedule. Same goes for choosing classes, put together a schedule that makes sense and doesn’t have you sprinting all over campus.

Get To Know Your Professors

When it comes to the educator/student relationship forget everything you knew in high
school. Take the time to get to know your professors outside of the classroom. Visit them

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Professor Peter Zachari (Pictured here performing in a production of Shake It Up!) was one of my biggest influences in college and taught me so much outside of the classroom. Today I credit much of my success to him.

during office hours and take advantage of lunch offers. Each semester our dining hall actually offered free lunch to student dining with their professor. I can’t even begin to describe some of the amazing conversations and insights I receive during these lunches and chats, especially when it came to classes I was struggling with. It also helps later on down the career line if you’re looking for a letter of recommendation or the scoop on an internship.

Don’t Be Shy

Be sure to branch out in that first year and strike up conversations with strangers. This is how I made many of the friends I had during my first semester. Some didn’t stick around beyond that first half of the year but the experience of chatting up that one stranger gave me the confidence to chat up and meet others. One of the best things I would do, and this is something I highly encourage, would pick a couple people in class and exchange contact information. This way I had someone to reach out to if I missed a class and needed notes and offered them the same. I can see this idea changing a bit with the wake of social networking (Facebook didn’t show up until my second semester of college and it was a difference animal back then). Get to know the people in classes and out. It’s a lifesaver!

Sleep

Had I known about the ‘3 by 5’ rule when I was in college I would have been sure to follow it. The rule states that you should study three hours a day, five days a week. Now, that sounds like a lot but when I consider the little bits of time I would waste between classes, I could have been studying. Try to find those random chunks of time during your day to get in your reading or studying to help limit the all-nighters. Cramming to all hours and not getting any sleep is super counter-productive.  Try your best to study those three hours a day and see how much it helps balance your social life and sleep schedule!

Get Off Campus and Explore

I went to college in historic Salem, MA (home of the witch trials!). There was so much to explore and experience outside of the halls of academia. I encourage you to explore the area where you are receiving your education and learn more about it. Even if you feel like you o to school in the middle of nowhere, get to know your new home! Salem was a short train ride away from Boston which offered even more exploration. Take advantage and have fun!

Don’t Buy All Your Books Right Away

Okay, this is gonna raise some eyebrows but I’m gonna go ahead and say it. Don’t buy your books right away. Wait until you get to class, check out the syllabus and go from there. I took a lot of literature classes which required hundreds of dollars for books. It was enough to make one cry. The first thing I would do is take a look at the workload the professor was requiring and whether or not I could make it work with everything else I had going on that semester. If I was sticking with the class I would then look for the book online rather than in the bookstore in an effort to save money. If I ended up dropping the class or switching to another, I wasn’t stuck with books I wouldn’t need. Also check out Studentrate.com to compare textbook prices.

Discounts! Discounts everywhere!

Carry your school ID everywhere, especially if you live in a “college town.” So many different restaurants and shops offered student discounts but didn’t advertise them. Don’t ever be afraid to ask about student discounts for food, movies even museum admissions. You’d be surprised where you can save a few dollars here and there if you just ask. Be sure to have your ID for when they say ‘yes’!

Have Fun

I’m sure there are many more things I could mention but for now I’ll leave it with what I have above. As I think of more I’ll certainly write up new blog posts. All said and done g out there and discover the new you. This is a whole new chapter of your life and a time to discover who you truly are. Get out there and do it!

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

My Unsolicited Advice to the Class of 2017

It’s hard to believe that it was ten years ago that I stepped onto the Salem State College (now Salem State University)  campus as a freshmen. I honestly went into that first year with no idea who I was, what I was doing, or where I was going. It took that entire year to being to put the pieces together and it was the end of the year I learned the secret to success in college and beyond:

Get involved!

My first real involvement on campus was when I auditioned for Human Action Theatre. Being an English major it was a bit of a long-shot but the director took a chance on me and sure enough I found myself on stage for the 2004 orientation. It was a thrill.humanaction09

From there I joined the, now disbanded, Students’ Works Theatre Project, an independent theatre group that gave opportunities to students to write, direct and perform 10-minute plays. It was a chance to stretch my wings and get to know people on campus.

I had found myself a niche in the theatre world and even began taking classes in the department. This lead to my applying to direct the 2005 Human Action Theatre (a position I held until my last summer at Salem State in 2009) while serving as assistant director for Summer Theatre’s Return to the Forbidden Planet.

From one simple audition, my entire world was changed.

Following my summer being immersed in the theatrical world I added on a second major- theatre. This found me in a whole new world and soon I was the publicist for the Student Theatre Ensemble.

At this point I must also caution against limiting yourself to just one area of involvement. While the theatre world at SSC was great, there was a world beyond that. Thankfully, because of my involvement with orientation and Human Action Theatre, I had made a lot of connections in the Student Government,  Student Commuter Association, and more.

These connections lead me into a new world with the residence halls as I signed on to become and academic mentor in the freshmen hall and a member of the National Residence Hall Honorary. My position in the hall gave me the unique opportunity to get the underclassmen involved as I was constantly chatting with them and letting them know about events on campus.

My final year at Salem State proved to be one of the busiest as a was elected into the Public Relations position for Program Council, a group responsible for some of the biggest events on campus. It was a crazy and amazing time and though there were a lot of long nights, close calls on getting assignments in and very little free time, I regret none of it. My schedule was always full but for all the right reasons.

I am deeply indebted to Bruce Perry and Becky Jimenez in the campus center for all the opportunities they gave me. If you are looking to get involved and don’t know where to start, these are certainly the people to talk to. They believed in me, helped me learn to push beyond my limits, and turned me into a leader. I can’t leave out Jeff Smith and Helene Collins who put up with so much from me and were great shoulders to lean on.

I can’t promise that your college experience will be the same as mine but I can promise that if you go through the next four years without checking out what is going on beyond the classroom, you will regret it. During my time at Salem State my professors taught me a lot about the world, getting involved on campus taught me a lot about life.

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.

Pictured Above: The 2009 Cast of Human Action Theatre. Photo Courtesy of Stu Grieve.

Social Networking in the Classroom: Facebook

Last week I introduced my all new blog series and in the introductory entry I talked about the pros and cons of introducing social networking to the educational environment. The series continues, looking at each network and it’s uses in the classroom!

Facebook, for all its flaws, is still on top when it comes to the world of social networking with over 1 billion users (665 million daily active users). Facebook isn’t going anywhere. It is even predicted that within the next two years Facebook will have created and introduced Education Accounts. But why wait?

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Bringing a social networking site into the classroom can, understandably, be a difficult decision for any educator. There are many factors to take into account including your own safety and privacy. The number one rule I will provide: Never use your personal account!

There are very easy ways around having to provide your personal account information to students. Creating a Page or Group for your classroom allows you to have conversations and share with students without giving them access to your information. They can send private messages through the page or hold conversations on the Page’s newsfeed.

I suggest taking the time to understand the ins and outs of both Pages and Groups to find out what works best for your classroom. From there it’s just a matter of what you choose to do!

Communication: A Facebook page or group opens up a common line of communication between students and the teacher as well as other students with questions. The digital environment can encourage more conversations and less cliques. Wallflowers are more likely to contribute and work together with others in this environment, allowing them a time to shine.

A page also allows for absent students to stay connected and up-to-speed with what it happening in the classroom while they are gone. The can participate in online discussions as a potential way to earn class credit without being there (establish and enforce a rule on this early on and stick with it! Students may abuse the right!).

A Page or Group on Facebook also allows parents to stay connected with what is going on in their student’s classes. Groups allow you to upload files so forgetful students have access to permission slips and other important documents via the internet and don’t have to stress about looking for it! This also allows you to share photos from class trips, classroom activities and other on goings! Parents won’t need to pry information from their kids in order to have a conversation about their day.

Apps: Facebook offers a large variety of apps that are perfect for the educational environment. There are 200 available apps, some developed by Facebook, others by outside developers. To save you from searching I found some great one’s through Brian Jenkins’ blog post at TeachHub!

Study Groups: Students use this popular application to work together outside of the classroom. They collaborate on group projects, share notes, discuss assignments, and help each other prepare for tests.
SAT Quest: This application prepares students for the SAT with short, five question SAT prep games. The questions become more difficult as students move to higher levels.
Quizlet: This handy tool is on of tne of the largest and fastest growing flashcard websites. Over 1 million registered users have uploaded tens of millions of flash cards. Flash card sets are available for a variety of topics including standardized test prep, languages, math, and science.
To Do List: Students use this application to organize their school assignments. Students can make multiple lists.
Zoho Online Office: Although it’s designed for businesses, this application is used by students to store their documents and class presentations online. They can then share their documents with other students. It’s a great way for students to manage their information.
Quiz Monster: Students create their own quizzes with this very popular application.
GRE GMAT SAT Vocabulary Flashcards: This application includes 5000 words students should be familiar with before taking the SAT. It also includes 1100 words for the GRE and GMAT tests. Students mark a word based on its level of difficulty. An easy-level word repeats after nine days and a medium level-word repeats after three days.

Once you’ve established how you plan on using Facebook in the classroom it’s important to keep with it! Educator Dr. Rachel Baum of Wisconsin describes Facebook in the classroom as a ladder approach:

Baum also offers up her own list of Do’s and Don’ts of using Facebook in the classroom:

Post Frequently: This keeps the conversations fresh and keeps them going. It begins to feel more like a discussion rather than notifications that can get lost in a student’s regular newsfeed.

Post More Outside Information Then Class Announcements: Though many students won’t read these, those who do are invited to deepen their experience in your class.

Connect What You Post To What You’re Teaching: In a few words, connect what you are posting (videos and articles) to what the class is learning and make it a part of the next class discussion.

Let Students Know You’re Looking At Their Work: A fine example:
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Don’t Make Facebook A Requirement: Many students may not be on Facebook either as a personal choice or the choice of their parents. Be sure to think of alternative ways to connect with students who may not be on social networks.

Don’t Be Afraid of Inappropriate Use: By introducing an educational aspect of Social Networking to students many educators have found that it has become less of a distraction and allows students to understand how to responsibly use this technology.

There is so much more to be discussed! Please use the comments section to share your own ideas, secrets or even do’s and don’ts you’ve discovered by introducing Facebook to your classroom!

Josh Gunderson is an award-winning Bullying Prevention and Social Media Specialist. Josh has appeared on MTV, Comedy and National Geographic. For more information about Josh and his educational programs please visit www.HaveYouMetJosh.com

You can purchase Josh’s book “Cyberbullying: Perpetrators, Bystanders & Victims” on Amazon! Available in paperback or for Kindle.